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Turning passion into career

Witsaman plans to continue her love for art in college and as a career for people in need of therapy

Senior+Kathryn+Witsaman+sketches+a+picture+of+hair+for+her+AP+Studio+Art+class.+Witsaman+has+been+doing+art+since+she+was+in+grade+school%2C+but+started+to+take+it+much+more+seriously+in+high+school.+
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Turning passion into career

Senior Kathryn Witsaman sketches a picture of hair for her AP Studio Art class. Witsaman has been doing art since she was in grade school, but started to take it much more seriously in high school.

Senior Kathryn Witsaman sketches a picture of hair for her AP Studio Art class. Witsaman has been doing art since she was in grade school, but started to take it much more seriously in high school.

Photo by Grace Silver

Senior Kathryn Witsaman sketches a picture of hair for her AP Studio Art class. Witsaman has been doing art since she was in grade school, but started to take it much more seriously in high school.

Photo by Grace Silver

Photo by Grace Silver

Senior Kathryn Witsaman sketches a picture of hair for her AP Studio Art class. Witsaman has been doing art since she was in grade school, but started to take it much more seriously in high school.

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Senior Kathryn Witsaman discovered her love for art at an early age. She tried playing sports, taking up an instrument and writing stories, but nothing seemed to fascinate her as much as art and drawing.

I always enjoyed being creative, and art was another way for me to express this creativity,” Witsaman said. “[In grade school], I even got my mom to sign me up for an art class at the community center.”

Art started out as a hobby for Witsaman, but she soon started to research possible careers involving art and a new love she found during school: psychology. After much time spent researching careers, she stumbled upon art therapy.

“Art therapy is an upcoming career that uses art as a therapeutic method to help people deal with obstacles,” Witsaman said. “I want to pursue this because it is a way for me to use art to help others and make a difference in their lives.”

Art therapists work in all kinds of environments, such as schools, nursing homes or hospitals. They also experience working with all types of patients–those who are abused, soldiers who have PTSD, cancer patients.

“I was talking to an art therapist when I was visiting Herron [University],” Witsaman said, “and she said she took the uniforms of soldiers, shredded them up and turned it into paper to draw on. It’s neat because [she] takes something that represents horrible experiences and turns it into something beautiful.”

During her time at Roncalli, Witsaman started to take her art more seriously and see her art as more than just a hobby. As she drew more, she was able to see her improvements. After taking three years of AP studio art, Witsaman has been forced to try new things and think outside of her comfort zone.

“I think [Witsaman] has become more confident in her decisions and has explored many more options in her work,” art teacher Mr. Mark Stratton said. “She is willing to take bigger chances than in the past.”

After a long decision process, Witsaman decided to go to the University of Indianapolis (UIndy), even though she was accepted into Herron (IUPUI’s school of art). UIndy has a more specific and structured program that focuses on Witsaman’s major of art therapy.

“I really like the program at UIndy,” Witsaman, “so I decided to go there because I felt like it would be a better fit for me and my major.”

To get into UIndy’s art program, Witsaman had to present her portfolio (a collection of her works) and go through an interview to get scholarships.

Witsaman started an Instagram page (@Sketched_Stuff) her freshman year so others could follow her artwork throughout her high school career. From quick sketches, to precisely drawn masterpieces, Witsaman proves she can conquer any piece of artwork.

“It’s kind of scary to be an art major in college,” Witsaman said, “but I’m super excited for the opportunities it presents and being able to do something I love for a living.”

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Turning passion into career